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PostPosted: Sun Jun 03, 2018 2:00 pm 
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This answer is no. See https://science.howstuffworks.com/jupit ... center.htm

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 03, 2018 3:29 pm 
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That article is a bit misleading at best. It makes it sound like every planet has it’s own barycenter, but only Jupiter’s is significant enough to note. Actually, the entire Solar System has a barycenter that’s is a result of the combined mass and positions of all its components. Jupiter is indeed the most dominant, but Saturn plays a significant part, Uranus and Neptune aren’t negligible, while all the rest add their little bit too.

All Solar System bodies (including the sun itself) revolve around the common barycenter. Even earth’s moon really doesn’t trace a circle around the earth. It’s moving in a wavy line counterclockwise around the barycenter as viewed from a point above the north pole of the solar system. Of course, from an earthbound perspective, it looks like it’s going around us.

Anyway, as a result of the combined mass of solar system objects, and since they’re all in motion around the sun, the barycenter loops irregularly around the sun, sometimes within the sun itself, sometimes just outside the sun. The former occurs mainly when Jupiter and Saturn are roughly in opposite directions from the sun, the latter when they’re roughly in the same direction, but of course, Uranus and Neptune (and all the others) have an effect too.

The accompanying image shows the looping path of the barycenter. The center of rotation between the sun and Jupiter simply isn’t always 7% of a solar radius from the sun as the article implies.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 03, 2018 8:32 pm 
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Joe,
I wondered why he didn't mention the effect of the other planets. Thanks for the correct explanation.

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