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PostPosted: Mon Aug 08, 2016 5:14 pm 
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Backyard telescopes and amateur eyes see where “pro” astronomers can’t

http://arstechnica.com/science/2016/08/ ... astronomy/

Quote:
Today, professionals say amateur work is essential to help us understand how giant planets behave and how often they're hit by something. Amateurs were the ones who discovered Jupiter being smacked at least five times in recent years. And amateurs were called upon to help NASA and others figure out what to observe first when the Juno spacecraft arrived at the king of planets this summer.

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 15, 2016 5:14 pm 
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Turning this into an amateur astronomer general thread.

Amateurs Aid Discovery of Pulsing White Dwarf

http://www.skyandtelescope.com/observin ... r-scorpii/

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 20, 2016 3:57 pm 
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South African astronomers solve mystery of ancient stellar explosion

http://www.masslive.com/living/index.ss ... osion.html

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An international team has recently solved this mystery, publishing their findings in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. Observations by astronomers primarily from the University of Cape Town, using the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) and other telescopes at the South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO) in Sutherland, South Africa, revealed that the nebula was likely formed in a stellar explosion just over 1,500 years ago.

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 01, 2016 2:52 pm 
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Unistellar: This telescope lets consumers detect asteroids to help keep Earth safe

http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/unistellar-thi ... fe-1594284

Couldn't read this, I refuse to disable my adblocker and make my computer vulnerable to malware and intrusive ads. YMMV.

Also:

NASA Program Deploys Deep Learning to Ward Off Asteroid Attack

http://satprnews.com/2016/11/29/nasa-pr ... id-attack/

If computers are gonna do it, why employ amateur astronomers?

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PostPosted: Fri Dec 16, 2016 1:40 pm 
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Amateur astronomers discover a binary pulsar system on crowdsourced technology

http://www.astronomy.com/news/2016/12/a ... sar-system

Quote:
The latest result, PSR J1913+1102, is a radio pulsar Einstein@Home computers found in data from Arecibo. Because its partner is silent, at first astronomers only knew that the system contained a pulsar plus a companion in orbit. They pieced together numerous lines of evidence to arrive at the full picture. First, the total mass of the system was large, meaning the pulsar’s companion was at least as massive as the Sun. Many pulsars orbit smaller white dwarfs, so this was a big tip. Second, the nearly—but not quite—circular orbit of the system suggests that some force kicked the system after the pulsar had already evolved. The most reasonable explanation, then, is that the companion is also a neutron star, and the kick was its own supernova explosion as it ended its life as a main sequence star.

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 09, 2017 5:06 pm 
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Global glow for astronomy clubs

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city ... 409396.cms

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Amateur astronomy clubs in the city have been able to define the size and shape of an asteroid called 22 Kalliope and their observations have been recognised by the International Occultation Timing Association (IOTA).

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PostPosted: Mon Mar 13, 2017 11:44 pm 
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Truckdriver builds world's largest amateur telescope using 900 pound mirror originally meant for Cold War spy satellite

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... scope.html

Quote:
'I was agog,' said Patrick Wiggins, NASA/JPL solar system ambassador to Utah. 'It's inspiring that someone with very modest means could put that together. It shows they're very dedicated or a little loony or a bit of both.'


The primary is 70", the focal-ratio is f/6-ish, leaving a focal length of 420"/35' focal length.

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PostPosted: Thu Mar 23, 2017 7:15 am 
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A British Teenager Has Corrected a Mistake in NASA's Data

http://www.sciencealert.com/a-british-t ... asa-s-data

Quote:
A British school student recently contacted NASA to point out that there was an error in data recorded on the International Space Station (ISS), earning him thanks from the US space agency.

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PostPosted: Sun May 28, 2017 8:14 am 
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Citizen Astronomers on the Hunt for Exploding Stars

http://www.astrowatch.net/2017/05/citiz ... t-for.html

Quote:
The hunt for supernovae is available on Zoouniverse.org. The site allows citizen scientists to analyze images provided by the SkyMapper Transient Survey. This survey is searching and studying supernovae and other transient objects using the SkyMapper 1.3 m telescope at the ANU Siding Spring Observatory in Australia.

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 04, 2017 12:43 pm 
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Citizen Scientists Uncover a Cold New World Near Sun

http://www.astrowatch.net/2017/06/citiz ... d-new.html

Quote:
Days after the Backyard Worlds website debuted on February 15, Bob Fletcher, a science teacher in Tasmania, identified a very faint object moving across the WISE images. It was soon also flagged by three other citizen scientists from Russia, Serbia, and the United States. After some initial investigation by the research team, which originally called the object "Bob's dwarf," Faherty was awarded time on NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility in Hawaii, where she confirmed that it was a previously unknown brown dwarf just a few hundred degrees warmer than Jupiter. The authors say that sky surveys had missed this object because it's too faint. All four volunteers are co-authors on the scientific paper announcing the discovery.

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 08, 2017 2:26 pm 
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Help Astronomers Track a Giant, Ringed Planet

http://www.skyandtelescope.com/astronom ... ed-planet/

Quote:
PDS 110 is a star in the Orion OB1a association, northwest of Orion’s belt. The association, like many others in Orion, contains young, massive stars less than 20 million years old. PDS 110 itself is estimated to be 7 to 10 million years old and is still growing, accreting material from its natal cloud. The star’s mass is 1.6 times that of the Sun, but unlike the Sun, it emits a lot of light at infrared wavelengths, probably emitted by the surrounding gas and dust heated by the infant star’s radiation. Since it’s relatively bright, it has been the object of surveys for decades.

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 6:24 pm 
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The universe through a glass darkly

http://physicsworld.com/cws/article/ind ... ass-darkly

Quote:
Pickering employed up to 80 women during his 42-year stint as director, at a time when women still did not even have the right to vote. This team of gifted and talented women went on to make huge contributions to astronomy as we know it today, and author Dava Sobel tells their untold tale in her latest book – The Glass Universe: How the Ladies of the Harvard Observatory Took the Measure of the Stars.


For more, read Rich Futrell's review of The Glass Universe in the April 2017 edition of Astral Projections on page 10.

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 30, 2017 3:20 pm 
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How I salvaged materials to build a great eclipse scope

http://www.astronomy.com/news/2017/08/salvaged-scope

Quote:
A little trash picking, a little scrap scrounging, and some father-son elbow grease turned a hunk of junk telescope into an eclipse machine.

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 02, 2017 5:53 pm 
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Tabetha Boyajian: Did Amateur Astronomers Discover Aliens?

http://www.npr.org/2017/09/29/554105915 ... ver-aliens

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 23, 2018 2:34 pm 
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Amateur astronomers have made several important finds

http://www.dailyliberal.com.au/story/51 ... discovery/

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 30, 2018 1:09 pm 
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Long-lost 'zombie' NASA satellite is found by amateur astronomers

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/ ... llite.html

Quote:
NASA researchers thought that the failed Imager for the Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) satellite was lost.

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 30, 2018 2:15 pm 
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Spaceweather.com carried this story several days ago (without all the excess baggage of the Daily Mail page)...

http://spaceweather.com/archive.php?view=1&day=26&month=01&year=2018

Like the Daily Mail, Spaceweather also notes that Tilley is an amateur astronomer, but there's no elaboration on this aspect from either source. However, Tilley is clearly an amateur satellite tracker via radio, and particularly in the realm of spy satellites, which is how he stumbled on this one (lucky perhaps, but luck favors the prepared). The best story is Tilley's own, at his blog...

https://skyriddles.wordpress.com/2018/01/21/nasas-long-dead-image-satellite-is-alive/

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 08, 2018 1:45 pm 
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Amateur Astronomers Have Always Been Great at Finding Satellites

https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/a ... -moonwatch

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A bunch of teens at picnic tables were the first people to track Sputnik I.

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 08, 2018 9:14 pm 
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How the Government Controls Sensitive Satellite Data

https://www.wired.com/story/how-the-gov ... llite-data

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 21, 2018 3:38 pm 
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A Star Is Shorn: The Fine Art of Spotting Supernovae Is Ideal for Amateurs

https://www.scientificamerican.com/arti ... -amateurs/

Quote:
With a simple telescope and camera, a backyard skywatcher has helped professional astronomers witness the never-before-seen beginnings of a star’s explosive death

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 21, 2018 4:33 pm 
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He Took a Picture of a Supernova While Setting Up His New Camera

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/21/scie ... amera.html

Spoilers in the headline, obviously.

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 21, 2018 8:11 pm 
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The more significant aspect is that he captured the SN as it first lit up...

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In 2016 an amateur astronomer captured the first flashes of a supernova on camera. A team of researchers has used his and follow-up observations to reveal unprecedented details about these titanic explosions.

http://www.skyandtelescope.com/astronomy-news/amateur-astronomer-captures-supernovas-first-light/

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PostPosted: Sun May 20, 2018 10:54 am 
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Amateur Astronomer's Data Helps Scientists Discover a New Exoplanet

http://www.astrowatch.net/2018/05/amate ... helps.html

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PostPosted: Wed May 23, 2018 7:19 am 
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Stargazing Live: World record attempt in action as thousands gather across Australia

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-05-23/s ... ia/9787990

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The current world record for the most people stargazing across multiple venues, set in 2015 by the Australian National University, is 7,960 people across 37 locations.

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 17, 2018 12:35 pm 
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Asteroids and Adversaries: Challenging What NASA Knows About Space Rocks

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/14/scie ... rvold.html

Quote:
Two years ago, NASA dismissed and mocked an amateur who criticized a database of asteroid findings. Now Nathan Myhrvold is back, with peer-reviewed papers of the same criticisms. NASA is still ignoring him.

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