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 Post subject: Daylight Astronomy
PostPosted: Sun May 05, 2019 11:27 am 
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Location: Gilford Park
aghluaghlug


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 Post subject: Re: Daylight Astronomy
PostPosted: Sun May 05, 2019 6:17 pm 
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Not sure what "aghluaghlug" means, but I've seen all the illustrated planets visually in the daytime, except for Saturn (I might have, but I don't recall well enough to claim it). Mainly it was through binoculars, but sometimes in a scope too. All were found manually, no go-to or setting circles.

I glimpsed Mars once in the daytime with unaided eyes when it was near perihelic opposition and at its brightest this past summer (2018). I've seen Venus a number of times with unaided eyes in the daytime, but it's relatively easy since it's so dang bright almost all the time (I've even seen it just a few degrees from the sun, but special precautions must be taken).

At it's perihelic opposition, Mars can reach about the same maximum brightness of Jupiter (approaching magnitude -3), but since Jupiter is then about twice the diameter of Mars at its largest, the light is spread over a much greater area, so Jupiter's surface brightness is much lower. As a result, Jupiter in the daytime through binoculars or a scope looks "ghostly," as the picture shows. The same goes for Saturn, but it's fainter and even more ghostly.

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